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SHELL OF THE MONTH SEPTEMBER 2021

Leporicypraea Mappa Linn, 1758

under coral heads night dive 25 meters

Bohol Island, Philippines

No collection of Cypraea is complete without at least one specimen pf the Mao Cowry. It’s large size and unique map pattern make it one of the most stunning of all shells.UThe dorsum is beige in color completely covered by aa brown lineate pattern and a large ”map” formed where the mantle meets.

The Map Cowry is very consistent yet it is split into many specie with new names recently added to the  list.  There is much debate over where they are full specie, sup-specie or merely regional varieties.

All specimens form each region are consistent in size , shape, color, and other identifying marks. 

Occasional Philippine may have rich dark pattern and are especially stunning.  Some populations are quite pale and look faded though they are not.  Also are overcast is found and had its own variety name.

Cypraea geographica Shilder & Shilder 1938 is recognized by most as a full specie.  it has dark orange between the teeth, is smaller in size and tends to be elongate.  It is easy to pick put. 

Wikipedia lists the following but there are more!

Subspecies[edit]

Subspecies of Leporicypraea mappa include according to the World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS):[6]

Leporicypraea mappa admirabilis Lorenz, 2002

Leporicypraea mappa aliwalensis Lorenz, 2002

Leporicypraea mappa mappa (Linnaeus, 1758)

The Indo-Pacific Molluscan also includes:[2]

Leporicypraea mappa rosea (Gray, 1824)

Leporicypraea mappa panerythra (Melvill, 1888)

Leporicypraea mappa viridis (Kenyon, 1902)

Leporicypraea mappa geographica (Schilder & Schilder, 19

The photo below is my drawer of Mappa.  All have data slips and at least one of each variety is represented.  See how similaar the varieties look.

Specimens from the IndianOcean and South Pacific will cost the collector about ten times as much as a Philippine specimen, others more.

Not all specimens have well formed maps.  Philippine specimens are easy to obtain so those with inferior patterns should be avoided,

This choice specimens was donated by Richard Kent

SHELL OF THE MONTH JULY 2021

Hexaplex cichoreum
(Gmelin, 1791) [1]

18Hexaplex cichoreum (Gmelin, 1791)  iS a Western Pacific murex of medium to large size, known for its interesting and variable varices. In some specimens they are short and curled while in others stubby. Some populations have long varices (spines) as in this specimen. The shell is commonly white with orange brown bands and the varices are dark chocolate to black. Rare specimens are melanistic and others albino, The spire also varies from short too long.

This specimen is of good size, 4″ long and was collected in the coral reefs by SCUBA off Palawan Island, Philippines in 2018.

June Meeting

Good morning all. Due to an unexpected cancellation of this month’s speaker, and the lateness of the cancellation, I was not able to find a speaker for this month. I have put together a short program titled “Oh, It’s only sand”, mainly for the new shell pile attendees. I have a lot of microscopic shells from the sand from the apertures of the shells found at Phipp’s Park. I will not take too long, maybe twenty to twenty five minutes, and there will be plenty of time to do a show and tell. Sorry for doing too many programs, but hopefully we will have real meetings again. If we have a real meeting in June, I will have a good program for that. 

 Here is a blurb,This month’s program will be presented by Carole Marshall. The title is “Oh, It’s only sand”. This program will explore the sand that came out of the recent dredge piles at Phipp’s Park. The micro shells found in that sand and how you can look for some of these tiny treasures. Most of us, consider the sand a nuisance, but there are a myriad of tiny treasures if we only look.
In addition, feel free to show some of your treasures, as we will have a show and tell. Your chance to tell something of a special shell or even a thrift store find.  The meeting is open to everyone, so feel free to join our ZOOM meeting.
  Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/832893 40441?pwd=Y05VNXNESEZVQ3o5 S2NEZk8xaGdBQT09  Meeting ID: 832 8934 0441 Passcode: 429109 One tap mobile +19292056099,,83289340441#,,,,*429109# US (New York) +13017158592,,83289340441#,,,,*429109# US (Washington DC) Dial by your location +1 929 205 6099 US (New York) +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC) Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdb1KYuKAa

May 2021 Meeting

Good morning all. Due to an unexpected cancellation of this month’s speaker, and the lateness of the cancellation, I was not able to find a speaker for this month. I have put together a short program titled “Oh, It’s only sand”, mainly for the new shell pile attendees. I have a lot of microscopic shells from the sand from the apertures of the shells found at Phipp’s Park. I will not take too long, maybe twenty to twenty five minutes, and there will be plenty of time to do a show and tell. Sorry for doing too many programs, but hopefully we will have real meetings again. If we have a real meeting in June, I will have a good program for that. 

 Here is a blurb,This month’s program will be presented by Carole Marshall. The title is “Oh, It’s only sand”. This program will explore the sand that came out of the recent dredge piles at Phipp’s Park. The micro shells found in that sand and how you can look for some of these tiny treasures. Most of us, consider the sand a nuisance, but there are a myriad of tiny treasures if we only look.


In addition, feel free to show some of your treasures, as we will have a show and tell. Your chance to tell something of a special shell or even a thrift store find.  The meeting is open to everyone, so feel free to join our ZOOM meeting.


  Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/832893 40441?pwd=Y05VNXNESEZVQ3o5 S2NEZk8xaGdBQT09  Meeting ID: 832 8934 0441 Passcode: 429109 One tap mobile +19292056099,,83289340441#,,,,*429109# US (New York) +13017158592,,83289340441#,,,,*429109# US (Washington DC) Dial by your location +1 929 205 6099 US (New York) +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC) Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdb1KYuKAa

April Meeting

Our speaker will be Jessica Pate who has an undergraduate degree from UNC-Chapel Hill and a graduate degree from Florida Atlantic University.  She has studied sea turtles in Florida, Central America, and West Africa.  She has also taught marine biology on traditionally rigged schooners and has crossed the Atlantic Ocean by sail.  In 2016, Jessica started the Florida Manta Project to study the biology and ecology of manta rays in South Florida and has discovered a potential rare nursery habitat.
Jessica will be talking about manta ray biology and global manta ray conservation, as well what discoveries that she has made about Florida’s manta rays.  You will also find out how to become a citizen scientist and contribute to important manta ray research!

February 10 Zoom Meeting

Born in Boston, John developed an interest in coin and stamp collecting at an early age, and also picked up the odd shell during the summer months.  After enlisting in the Air Force in 1972, he received a posting on Andersen Air Force Base, Guam in 1975 where he joined the Reef Roamers Shell Club on the base.  Eventually, he was assigned to Hickam AFB, Hawai’i in 1978.  He became a member of the Hawaiian Malacological Society, met his wife, Cheryl, in 1980, and after four years there, was transferred to San Antonio where he was stationed for four and a half years before returning to Hawai’i in 1987 for another six years.  He and Cheryl arrived in Florida in 1993.  He retired from the Air Force in 1996 after 24 years.  He worked at the Base Exchange on MacDill AFB for 21 years before retiring in 2019.

Over the years he has gone form a general collector to specializing in several families and fossils.  His main interests are limpets, Spondylidae, Strombidae, Cymatiidae/Ranellidae, Hawaiian fossils, and Florida fossils.  During his stint in San Antonio, he rekindled his stamp collecting when he discovered that there were stamps depicting shells.  His collection has grown tremendously over the years to include stamps, postal stationary, covers, cinderella items, and picture postcards.

John will be giving us a program on Shells on Stamps.  

John and Cheryl have won many awards for their exhibits and work extremely hard for the Conchologists of America. They have been Silent auction chairmen for many years and have earned the Neptunea award from COA.

Many of you may remember John as one of our Scientific judges for our last shell show. 

I hope you can make our ZOOM format. For those of you who are not joining our ZOOM meetings, I hope you will consider joining us. We do have a nice time and get to chat, see speakers who would normally not be able to appear in person at a club meeting and learn. We still do not have a date that we can meet at the Civic Center, but it is nice to keep in touch this way until the Civic center opens back up.

Zoom Meeting on Wednesday, January 13.

The Speaker will be Robert Myers. Here is the program:

Into the Heart of Diversiy, Ambon to West Papua A bit over a year ago we went on our last major dive trip, to Ambon and across the Banda Sea to West Papua. To you molluscophiles, Ambon is where all species bearing the name “amboinensis” come from, the Maluku Island where those named “molluccensis” come from, the Banda Islands where those named “bandanensis” come from. To naturalists, these are the islands just to the east of Wallace’s LIne, where the flora and fauna transitions from Asian to Australian lineages. While this was not a shelling trip (collecting is forbidden in preserves) and we saw few mollusks other than those without shells, it was a wonderful glimpse of the environment they inhabit.  Our first 5 nights were at Spice Island Divers in Ambon, on the shore of a bay that slopes steeply down to 1,000 m. The shallows offer a variety of  coastal coral community and soft sediment muck dive sites. The steep slopes are subject to seasonal upwelling and have a number of somewhat deeper-dwelling species that encroach into safe diving depths. The rest of the trip was on the Damai Dua, a luxurious fanisi-style live-aboard. Our 12-day excursion began with daily stops through a chain of isolated coral pinnacles and active volcanos including the historic island and city of Banda Niera. From there we travelled to the eastern end of Ceram, the largest of the Maluku Islands, then on to Misool, the largest of the Raja Ampat Islands. These isands sit on the West Papuan shelf and are home to the world’s most diverse coral reefs. Of special interest to us are species of carpet and epaulet (“walking”) sharks, found only on the Papuan-Australian continetal shelf. We finished the trip with a dive on a pinncale reef in the Fam Island group, a site we first dived 15 years earlier, during our first digital photo trip.

Zoom Meeting, Wednesday, Nov 11, 2020

November Program

The naming of shells is a personal thing. Some scientists exhibit a fair amount of whimsy in naming new species. One scientist I know named shells in honor of his cat and another for his dog!!! In addition to his children and wife. 

This month, since we still cannot meet in person, is an interesting program by our own Tom Ball. Tom is a musician and has a great collection of shells named for musical instruments, musical artists, writers, singers and scores.

Tom also has, in addition to his regular collection, a side inset of shells named for science fiction creatures, actors and characters. This month he will treat us to a program on this subset.

A fun program with a little history of how Tom even knew to look for these shells.

We hope you can tune in. Check your newsletter for the link. 

Carole